Hungarian Chicken Meatballs

Ground chicken and mushrooms make succulent meatballs’delicious simmered in a smooth tomato sauce with red and green peppers. Paprika warms the flavour and new potatoes turn these Hungarian chicken meatballs into a complete one-dish meal.

Source: Cook Smart for a Healthy Heart, Reader’s Digest Canada

 

Hungarian Chicken Meatballs
Hungarian Chicken Meatballs
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
4servings 35minutes 55minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 35minutes
Cook Time
55minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Melt the margarine in a frying pan. Add the onion and mushrooms, and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, for about 10 minutes, until the mixture is reduced, dark in colour and very thick. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and allow it to cool slightly.
  2. Add the chicken to the mushroom mixture and use a fork to combine. Add the breadcrumbs, egg, parsley and pepper. Mix the ingredients until thoroughly combined. Wet your hands, then shape it into 20 walnut-sized balls. Set aside.
  3. To make the sauce, heat the oil in a flameproof casserole dish. Add the onion and cook for 4–5 minutes, stirring frequently, until softened. Add the garlic and peppers, then cook, stirring constantly, for 2–3 minutes. Stir in the paprika and cook for 1 minute, then pour in the tomato sauce and bring to a boil over high heat.
  4. Stir in the caraway seeds and pepper to taste. Add the meatballs and the potatoes to the simmering sauce, taking care not to break up the meatballs. Bring the sauce back to simmering point, then cover and simmer gently for 35 minutes or until the potatoes are tender.
  5. Ladle the Hungarian chicken meatballs, potatoes and sauce into bowls and swirl on a little yogurt. Garnish with parsley and serve.
Recipe Notes

Per serving: 549 calories, 34 g protein, 26 g total fat, 5 g saturated fat, 118 mg cholesterol, 46 g total carbohydrate, 19 g sugars, 13 g fibre, 1145 mg sodium

When eaten regularly and in quantity, potatoes are a useful source of vitamin C—new potatoes contain the most, and eating them unpeeled retains the maximum goodness as the nutrients are concentrated under the skin.