Sticky Date and Walnut Pudding

On a cold winter day, nothing could be more welcoming than a pudding full of dates and toasted walnuts. It is easy to make and has a lovely moist texture. A tangy pineapple and marmalade sauce makes a perfect accompaniment for this sticky date and walnut pudding.

Source: Cook Smart for a Healthy Heart, Reader’s Digest Canada

 

Sticky Date and Walnut Pudding
Sticky Date and Walnut Pudding
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
8servings 25minutes 1hour
Servings Prep Time
8servings 25minutes
Cook Time
1hour
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Lightly grease a 1 litre (1 quart) pudding basin lined with a disc of parchment paper.
  2. Place the dates in a bowl and pour over 2 tablespoons milk. Stir to coat, then leave to soak.
  3. Place the margarine, sugar, eggs and remaining milk in a bowl. Sift over the flour, cinnamon and ginger, and beat with an electric mixer for 2 minutes or until smooth. Fold in the soaked dates and walnuts.
  4. Spoon the mixture into the pudding basin. Set the basin in a baking pan and pour in boiling water to come 1 cm up the sides of the basin. Cover the pan and basin with a tent of foil.
  5. Bake for about 1 hour or until the pudding is lightly risen and a skewer comes out clean. If not, bake a further 10 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, make the sauce. Drain the pineapple, reserving 2⁄3 cup of the juice. Blend the arrowroot with a little of the juice in a small saucepan, then stir in the remaining juice. Bring to a boil and simmer for 1 minute or until thickened and clear. Stir the pineapple and marmalade into the sauce and simmer for a further 2–3 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  7. Turn the sticky date and walnut pudding onto a serving plate. Spoon a little sauce over and serve with the remaining sauce in a bowl.
Recipe Notes

Per serving: 382 calories, 6 g protein, 16 g total fat, 2 g saturated fat, 54 mg cholesterol, 55 g total carbohydrate, 42 g sugars, 4 g fibre, 199 mg sodium

Walnuts have a high unsaturated fat content, particularly as linoleic acid. Some studies have suggested that regularly including a small quantity of walnuts in the diet can help to reduce high blood cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart attacks.