News: Nestle forced to stop making probiotic health claims

Imagine a product that could stop your child from getting sick, boost their immunity and cut down on days they

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Imagine a product that could stop your child from getting sick, boost their immunity and cut down on days they have to miss school. Not sure that such a product exists? Nestle’s advertising campaign for their Boost Kids Essentials drinks’which contain probiotics’tells consumers that they can do all that, and more. But the U.S. Federal Trade Commission has decided that the company has gone too far with its advertising and is ordering them to stop making the health claims, reports the CBC.

"Nestle’s claims that its probiotic product would prevent kids from getting sick or missing school just didn’t stand up to scrutiny," David Vladeck, the FTC’s director of consumer protection, told the Associated Press. This is the first time that the FTC has taken on advertising that involves probiotics.

To be fair, health experts say probiotics have health benefits . But it’s a bit of a stretch to suggest that if Suzie drinks this magical probiotic shake, she’ll be in the running for a gold star for perfect attendance, isn’t it?

As part of its settlement with the FTC, Nestle is no longer allowed to make these kinds of claims without having scientific evidence to back them up. But I have to wonder, did parents even believe these claims to begin with?

Do you think that advertising’especially for products involving children’needs to be more strictly regulated? Or is it up to the consumer to decide what’s bogus and what’s not?

Related:
Probiotics: Beneficial bacteria
How to choose the right probiotics
Are fortified foods worth the price?

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