Nutrition: More good news about blueberries

Not that I really need any more reasons to toss a handful of blueberries into my morning yogurt and granola,

nutritionmoregoodnewsaboutblueberries

Not that I really need any more reasons to toss a handful of blueberries into my morning yogurt and granola, but for people at risk for Type 2 diabetes, a study published in the month’s Journal of Nutrition showed that eating blueberries can have a positive effect.

The study, done at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center of the Louisiana State University System found that compounds in blueberries increased the insulin sensitivity for both the men and women who participated in the research. This is a key factor in preventing Type 2 diabetes.

This research adds to the scientific evidence that blueberries have lots of health benefits. Indigenous to North America, these tiny super fruits possess one of the highest antioxidant levels of any fruit or vegetable. Their rich blue colour reflects their high levels of plant pigments called anthocyanins. These natural compounds have a beneficial effect on the structure of the cells and tissues in our skin, joints and veins. Plus, other research done earlier this year found that blueberries may also be a major brain food’with blueberry juice significantly improving the results older adults achieved on cognitive and memory tests.

You can find out more about health-inducing blueberries and four other plants with significant health benefits in  "Power Pants" in the October issue of Best Health (on newsstands now), or link to “5 healthy plants to add to your diet.”

Looking for creative ways to add blueberries to your day? Check out “5 ways to enjoy blueberries," "Superfood Salad with Blueberries" and "Vegetable Couscous with Wild Blueberries.”

What are some of your favourite ways to add fresh or frozen blueberries to meals?

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