New & Now: Fruits and veggies combat effects of heart disease gene, plus more of the latest health news

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Want to know what happened in health headlines this week? Get all the hottest health and healthy-living news from around the web. Check back every Friday to find out what we’ve been buzzing about here at Best Health.

Bad genes? Eat your veggies

A "bad" gene which could increase the risk of heart disease by 20 percent may not be a match for a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. Researchers at McMaster and McGill universities found a healthy diet to virtually eliminate the increased risk caused by the gene called 9p21. | Herald Sun

Birth rates also affected by recession

It seems stocks aren’t the only thing to dip during a recession. A new report from the Pew Research Centre indicates women are more likely to put off having children while the economy was weak. The analysis was based on data collected on birth rates in the U.S. from 2007 (the year the recession began) to 2010. | NYTimes.com

Breast cancer awareness wristbands too edgy for middle school

A B.C. middle school has made the decision to ban students from wearing a new type of breast cancer awareness wristband. The wristbands, which feature the slogan ‘I (heart) boobies!’ have been deemed offensive by school officials, despite being part of a youth-oriented campaign. | Vancouver Sun

Being bilingual could slow the affects of Alzheimer’s

In a study involving 40 Alzheimer’s patients, Canadian researchers found bilingual patients were able to keep severe deterioration of the brain at bay for a longer period of time than those who spoke only one language. | Montreal Gazette

Health Canada reviewing antidepressant

A new study has suggested high doses of the antidepressant citalopram can affect the electrical activity of the heart, causing serious and potentially fatal abnormal heart rhythms. The drug is sold under a number of brand names, including Celexa. While Health Canada is not suggesting patients taking the drug stop or alter their dose, they should notify their doctors if they experience an abnormal heartbeat, shortness of breath, dizziness or fainting. | CTV News

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