Debate: Should juice be banned from school vending machines?

When it comes to sugar content, experts say juice is just as bad as pop. The only difference? Juice also

cranberry

When it comes to sugar content, experts say juice is just as bad as pop.

The only difference?

Juice also contains nutrients.

That’s what cranberry growers are arguing in the face of Michelle Obama’s ‘Let’s Move’ anti-obesity initiative, the guidelines of which would mean high-sugar cranberry juice gets axed from school vending machines.

While cranberries are rich in antioxidants, packed with vitamin C, low-calorie and help prevent urinary tract infections, experts argue that the sugar content in its juice form outweighs its benefits.

“There’s some evidence to show that cranberry juice can prevent urinary tract infections, but that doesn’t mean everyone should be drinking cranberry juice every day,” Margo Wootan, director of nutrition policy for the Center for Science in the Public Interest told USA today. “Only 3 percent of kids a year have urinary tract infections, compared to one-third who are overweight. Urinary tract infection is not a booming epidemic. Obesity is.”

According to Health Canada, the number of Canadians who are overweight or obese has increased dramatically over the past 25 years to two out of three. If we listen to the research, sugar is to blame’whether or not it’s hidden inside an otherwise healthy package.

What do you think? Should juice be banned from school vending machines? Would you support a similar initiative in Canada?

-Katharine Watts, Associate Web Editor

Related:
Should Canada tax sugary drinks?
Is Canada stuck on the road to obesity?
Are you eating too much sugar?

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