If you drink diet soda because you think it's the healthier, "skinnier" option, you might be interested to know that, in fact, it's not.

A new study from France, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that diet soda not only poses a risk for diabetes, but the risk is actually higher in those who drink diet soda than in those who drink regular sugar-sweetened soda.

One culprit?

Aspartame.

"Aspartame, one of the main artificial sweeteners used today, causes an increase in glycemia and consequently a rise in the insulin level in comparison to that produced by sucrose," the study's authors wrote.

Diet soda may be marketed as the healthier option, but recent studies have shown that it can cause depression, and make the effects of alcohol more potent.

Now, it can't even claim to be diet.

"It has been shown for the first time in a French population that high consumption of sweet soft drinks (both normal and ‘light’) is associated with a high increase in the risk of contracting Type II diabetes," the study's authors wrote. "This increased risk is all the greater for drinks of the ‘light’ or ‘diet’ type."

Want to switch to a real diet drink? Try water.

What do you think of this study? Do you usually choose diet soda over regular?

-Katharine Watts, Associate Web Editor

Related:
Why mixing diet soda with alcohol may be dangerous
Does diet soda increase your risk for depression?
Are artificial sweeteners really safe?