What happens to your body after you quit smoking

Think it's too late to quit smoking? Think again. Give up smoking for good and you could see the benefits almost immediately

What happens to your body after you quit smoking

Source: Adapted from Women’s Health Encyclopedia (Best Health: Reader’s Digest Canada)

When you give up smoking, the results in terms of improvements in your health begin almost immediately. If you can focus on these benefits, it will help you stop successfully.

20 minutes after quitting
Your blood pressure and pulse rate will fall. The temperature of your hands and feet return to normal.

Eight hours after quitting
Carbon monoxide in the blood drops to normal. The oxygen level increases to normal.

24 to 48 hours after quitting
Your chance of heart attack decreases. Your ability to taste and smell is enhanced.

Two to three months after quitting
Your circulation improves. Walking becomes easier. Your lung function increases as much as 30 percent.

Nine months to one year after quitting
Coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue and shortness of breath decrease. Lungs are clearer and more resistant to infection. The risk of coronary heart disease is reduced to half that of a person still smoking.

Three years after quitting smoking
Risk of coronary heart disease and stroke decreases to that of people who have never smoked.

Five years after quitting
The lung cancer rate for the average, former 20-per-day smoker decreases by almost half. Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat and esophagus is half that of a smoker.

10 years after quitting
The lung cancer death rate is similar to that of non-smokers. Precancerous cells are replaced. Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney and pancreas decreases.

Don’t miss out! Sign up for our free weekly newsletters and get nutritious recipes, healthy weight-loss tips, easy ways to stay in shape and all the health news you need, delivered straight to your inbox.

Secrets to Staying Healthy & Happy

Thai-Chicken-Salad-353

Thai Chicken Salad

This is excellent as a salad or as a filling for a wrap. I like using Thai basil in this recipe; look for it at an Asian market. Cashews contain heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, and sesame seeds are an excellent source of copper, manganese, magnesium and iron.

manmeat

Can food be sexist?

On my way out the door this morning I noticed an opened bag of Doritos on the coffee table. Last night my partner came home after a soccer game and got hungry. When I made a snide remark about his late-night snack, he quickly pointed out the chocolate I had just shoved into my purse. […]

coraandsue

The complete diet makeover

Find out how Cora Coady, winner of our Vichy Best Health Challenge, is getting her nutrition on track with the help of registered dietitian Sue Mah

crimes

Are you committing these health crimes?

You might be trying to live a healthy life, but some supposedly healthy habits could be sabotaging your plans. Find out if you’re committing a health crime’and what you can do about it